2018-2019 Winter Speaker Series

The Fascinating Life Cycle of Native Plants

Heather McCargo, Wild Seed Project

Wednesday, March 13th, 7:00pm


Heather McCargo: Wild Seed Project

Heather McCargo, founder and executive director of Wild Seed Project, is an educator with 30 years of expertise in plant propagation, landscape design, and conservation. She was the head plant propagator at the New England Wildflower Society’s Garden in the Woods during the 1990s, worked at several landscape architecture/planning firms specializing in ecological design, and has been a contributor to several research projects with USAID, the National Gardening Association, and MOFGA. She has lectured nationally and is widely published in journals and magazines such as Horticulture and American Nurseryman. More locally, Heather designed the master plan for the medicinal gardens at Avena Botanicals in Rockland and was the creator and lead teacher for the Bay School’s Agricultural Arts program. Heather has a B.A. in plant ecology from Hampshire College, and an M.A. from the Conway School of Landscape Design.


Understanding the Fascinating Life Cycle of Native Plants  
Flowering, pollinators and seed dispersal-


In this slide talk, Heather will show you the fascinating reproductive life cycle of different types of New England native plants and explains how we can change our landscape practices to support wild plant reproduction, pollinators, and other wildlife. Heather will explain simple outdoor seed sowing that anyone can do to help increase native plant populations. Growing native plants from seed is a great way to protect the genetic diversity of our native flora and to produce an abundance of plants inexpensively. Be part of a grassroots movement to sow native seeds!

Wild Seed Project is a Maine-based nonprofit that works to increase the use of native plants in all landscape settings in order to conserve biodiversity, encourage plant adaption in the face of climate change, safeguard wildlife habitat, and create pollination and migration corridors for insects and birds. We sell seeds of locally-grown native plants and educate the public on seed sowing so that a wide range of citizens can participate in increasing native plant populations. We also have an interactive website, www.wildseedproject.net, and publish an annual magazine, Wild Seed
 
Watercolors by
Sarah Stapler